Oxford Archeology Image Database

The north west face of the ziggurat at Dūr- Kurigalzu in the early 1970s before in the course of restoration showing the original brickwork (OAID 0106b, M. Roaf).
The north west face of the ziggurat at Dūr- Kurigalzu in the early 1970s before in the course of restoration showing the original brickwork (OAID 0106b, M. Roaf).

The Oxford Archeology Image Database is a new project, launched last June, dedicated to preserving and presenting fragile images from archeological excavations. Not only are the images available on the site in the best quality possible, they are also identified with a number of tags, making the images easier to find and identify. Tim Clayden tells us about his motivation for constructing this very useful database.

By Tim Clayden

The digital camera was invented in the 1970s, but the technology did not become available to ordinary users until the early 1990s. By the late 1990s digital photography was commonplace and for at least a decade film based images are now the rarity having been almost fully eclipsed by digital photographs. One immediate result of this technological revolution is that images are easily taken, copied, modified and distributed – all in the click of a keyboard.

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